Blog

Disrupt:Ops: What Security Managers Need to Know About Amazon S3 Exposures (2/2)

By Rich
What Security Managers Need to Know About Amazon S3 Exposures (2/2) Our first Disrupt:Ops post discussed how exposure of S3 data becomes such a problem, with some details on how buckets become public in the first place. This post goes a bit deeper, before laying a foundation for how to manage S3 to avoid these mistakes yourself.

Disrupt:Ops: What Security Managers Need to Know About Amazon S3 Exposures (1/2)

By Rich
As we spin up Disrupt:OPS we are beginning to post cloud-specific content over there, mixing theory with practical how-to guidance. Not to worry! We have plenty of content still planned for Securosis. But we haven’t added any staff at Securosis so there is only so much we can write. In the meantime, linking to non-product posts from Securosis should help ensure you don’t lose sleep over missing even a single cloud-related blog entry. So here’s #1 from the Disrupt:Ops hit parade! What Security Managers Need to Know About Amazon S3 Exposures (1/2) The accidental (or deliberate) exposure

Firestarter: Hardware Hacks and Lift and Pray

By Rich
Did China manage to hardware hack the Apple and Amazon data centers? Or did Bloomberg get it wrong? And what the heck can you do about it anyway? This week we start with a discussion of today’s blockbuster security news, before shifting gears back to cloud. It turns out most organizations are having to lift and shift to cloud, even when that is not ideal. We talk about some of your options, even in the face of ridiculous management timelines. Watch or listen:

Making an Impact with Security Awareness Training: Quick Wins and Sustained Impact

By Mike Rothman
Our last post explained Continuous Contextual Content as a means to optimize the effectiveness of a security awareness program. CCC acknowledges that users won’t get it, at least not initially. That means you need to reiterate your lessons over and over (and probably over) again. But when should you do that? Optimally when their receptivity is high – when they just made a mistake. So you determine the relative risk of users, and watch for specific actions or alerts. When you see such behavior, deliver the training within the context of what they see then. But that’s not enough.

Making an Impact with Security Awareness Training: Continuous Contextual Content

By Mike Rothman
As we discussed in the first post of our Making an Impact with Security Awareness Training series, organizations need to architect training programs around a clear definition of success, both to determine the most appropriate content to deliver, and also to manage management expectations. The definition of success for any security initiative is measurable risk reduction, and that applies just as much to security awareness training. We also covered the limitations of existing training approaches – including weak generic content, and a lack of instrumentation & integration, to determine the extent of risk reduction. To overcome these limitations we introduced the

Firestarter: Advanced Persistent Tenacity

By Rich
Mike and Rich discuss the latest Wired piece in Notpetya and how advanced attacks, despite the hype, are very much still alive and well. These days you might be a victim not because you are targeted, but because you are a pivot to a target or share some underlying technology. As a new Apache Struts vulnerability rolls out, we thought it a good time to re-address some fundamentals and evaluate the real risks of both widespread and targeted attacks. Watch or listen:

Making an Impact with Security Awareness Training: Structuring the Program

By Mike Rothman
We have long been fans of security awareness training. As explained in our 2013 paper Security Awareness Training Evolution, employees remain the last line of defense, and in all too many cases those defenses fail. We pointed out many challenges facing security awareness programs, and have since seen modest improvement in some of those areas. But few organizations rave about their security awareness training, which means we still have work to do. In our new series, Making an Impact with Security Awareness Training, we will put the changes of the last few years into proper context, and lay out our thoughts

Firestarter: Black Hat and AI… What Could Go Wrong?

By Rich
In this episode we review the lessons of this year’s Black Hat and DEF CON. In particular, we talk about how things have changed with the students we have in class, now that we’ve racked up over 5 years of running trainings on cloud security. then we delve into one of the biggest, and most confusing, trends… the mysteries of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. Considering our opinions of natural intelligence, you might guess where this heads… Watch or listen:

Firestarter: It’s a GDPR Thing

By Rich
Mike and Rich discuss the ugly reality that GDPR really is a thing. Not that privacy or even GDPR are bad (we’re all in favor), but they do require extra work on our part to ensure that policies are in place, audits are performed, and pesky data isn’t left lying around in log files unexpectedly. Watch or listen:

Scaling Network Security: The Scaled Network Security Architecture

By Mike Rothman
After considering the challenges of existing network security architectures (RIP Moat) we laid out a number of requirements for the new network security. This includes the needs for scale, intelligence, and flexibility. That’s all well and good, but how do you get there? We’ll wrap up this series by discussing a couple key architectural constructs which will influence how you build your future network security architecture. But before we go into specifics, let’s wrap a few caveats around the architecture. Not everything works for every organization. There may be cultural impediments to some of the ideas we
Page 1 of 326 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›