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Adrian Lane, Analyst & CTO

Adrian is a Security Strategist and brings over 22 years of industry experience to the Securosis team, much of it at the executive level. Adrian specializes in database security, data security, and software development. With experience at Ingres, Oracle, and Unisys, he has extensive experience in the vendor community, but brings a pragmatic perspective to selecting and deploying technologies having worked on “the other side” as CIO in the finance vertical. Prior to joining Securosis, Adrian served as the CTO/VP at companies such as IPLocks, Touchpoint, CPMi and Transactor/Brodia. He has been invited to present at dozens of security conferences, contributed articles to many major publications, and is easily recognizable by his “network hair” and propensity to wear loud colors. Once you get past his windy rants on data security and incessant coffee consumption, he is quite entertaining.

Adrian is a Computer Science graduate of the University of California at Berkeley with post-graduate work in operating systems at Stanford University. He can be reached at alane (at) securosis (dot) com.

Understanding and Selecting RASP 2019: New Paper

By Adrian Lane
Today we are launching our 2019 updated research paper from our recent series, Understanding and Selecting RASP (Runtime Application Self-Protection). RASP was part of the discussion on application security in just about every one of the hundreds of calls we have taken, and it’s clear that there is a lot of interest – and confusion – on the subject, so it was time to publish a new take on this category. And we would like to heartily thank you to Contrast Security for licensing this content. Without this type of support we could not bring this level of research to you, both

Enterprise DevSecOps: Security’s Role In DevOps

By Adrian Lane
As we mentioned earlier, DevOps is not all about tools and technology – much of its success lies in how people work within the model. We have already gone into great detail about tools and process, and we approached much of this content from the perspective of security practitioners getting onboard with DevOps. This paper is geared toward helping security folks, so here we outline their role in a DevOps environment. We hope to help you work with other teams and reduce friction. And while we deliberately called this paper “Enterprise DevSecOps”, please keep in mind that your development and IT

Enterprise DevSecOps: Security Test Integration and Tooling

By Adrian Lane
In this section we show you how to weave security into the fabric of your DevOps automation framework. We are going to address the questions “We want to integrate security testing into the development pipeline, and are going to start with static analysis. How do we do this?”, “We understand “shift left”, but are the tools effective?” and “What tools do you recommend we start with, and how do we integrate them?”. As DevOps encourages testing in all phases of development and deployment, we will discuss what a build pipeline looks like, and the tooling appropriate for stage. The security

Enterprise DevSecOps: Security Planning

By Adrian Lane
This post is intended to help security folks create an outline or structure for an application security program. We are going to answer such common questions as “How do we start building out an application security strategy?”, “How do I start incorporating DevSecOps?” and “What application security standards should I follow?”. I will discuss the Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC), introduce security items to consider as you put your plan in place, and reference some application security standards for use as guideposts for what to protect against. This post will help your strategy; the next one will cover tactical tool selection.

Enterprise DevSecOps: How Security Works With Development

By Adrian Lane
In our first paper on ‘Building Security Into DevOps’, given the ‘newness’ of DevOps for most of our readers, we included a discussion on the foundational principles and how DevOps is meant to help tackle numerous problems common to software delivery. Please refer to that paper is you want more detailed background information. For our purposes here we will discuss just a few principles that directly relate to the integration of security teams and testing with DevOps principles. These concepts lay the foundations for addressing the questions we raised in the first section, and readers will need to understand these

Enterprise DevSecOps: New Series

By Adrian Lane
DevOps is an operational framework which promotes software consistency and standardization through automation. It helps address many nightmare development issues around integration, testing, patching, and deployment – both by breaking down barriers between different development teams, and also by prioritizing things which make software development faster and easier. DevSecOps is the integration of security teams and security tools directly into the software development lifecycle, leveraging the automation and efficiencies of DevOps to ensure application security testing occurs in every build cycle. This promotes security and consistency, and helps to ensure that security is prioritized no lower that other quality metrics or

Understanding and Selecting RASP 2019: Selection Guide

By Adrian Lane
We want to take a more formal look at the RASP selection process. For our 2016 version of this paper, the market was young enough that a simple list if features was enough to differentiate one platform from another. But the current level of platform maturity makes top-tier products more difficult to differentiate. In our previous section we discussed principal use cases, then delved into technical and business requirements. Depending upon who is driving your evaluation, your list of requirements may look like either of those. With those driving factors in mind – and we encourage you to refer back as you

Understanding and Selecting RASP 2019: Integration

By Adrian Lane
*Editor’s note** We have been having VPN interruptions, so I apologize for the uneven cadence of delivery on these posts. We are working on the issue. In this section we will outline how RASP fits into the technology stack, in both production deployment and application build processes. We will show what that looks like and why it’s important to fit into these steps for newer application security technologies. We will close with a discussion of how RASP differs from other security technologies, and discuss advantages and tradeoffs of differing approaches. As we mentioned in the introduction, our research

Understanding and Selecting RASP 2019: Technology

By Adrian Lane
It is time to discuss technical facets of RASP products – including how the technology works, how it integrates into an application environment, and the advantages of different integration options. We will also outline important considerations such as platform support which impact the selection process. We will also consider a couple aspects of RASP technology which we expect to evolve over next couple years. How the Technology Works Over the last couple years the RASP market has settled on a couple basic approaches – with a few variations to enhance detection, reliability, or performance. Understanding the technology is important for understanding the

Understanding and Selecting RASP 2019: Use Cases

By Adrian Lane
Updated 9-13 to include business requirements The primary function of RASP is to protect web applications against known and emerging threats. In some cases it is deployed to block attacks at the application layer, before vulnerabilities can be exploited, but in many cases RASP tools process a request until it detects an attack and then blocks the action. Astute readers will notice that these are basically the classic use cases for Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) and Web Application Firewalls (WAFs). So why look for something new, if other tools in the market already provide the same application security benefits? The
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